What makes you think that elves are any more magical than something like a whale… You know what i mean? What if i tell you a story about how underneath the ocean there was this giant sea mammal that sang songs and it’s so big that it’s heart was the size of a car and you could crawl through the arteries? I mean, you’d think that’s pretty magical, right?

(Source: cortexiphankidd, via fassyy)

Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946)

(Source: vintagegal, via fassyy)

Before Sunrise (1995) dir. Richard Linklater

(Source: cinemove, via jodiecomer)

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theleoisallinthemind:

Henri Matisse, Nu Bleu II, 1952

radtracks:

bad reputation // joan jett

and i don’t really care if you think i’m strange
i ain’t gonna change
and i’m never gonna care about my bad reputation

(via pepesilvvia)

thewreckords:

James Blake // Limit To Your Love

(via zooeyclairedeschanel)

as-seenon-tv:

bigangry:

vaganto:

According to Stop Patriarchy, Mark Ruffalo sent a speech to be read at an abortion rights rally this weekend in Mississippi in which he expressed his frustration with the state legislature’s ongoing attempts to close every last women’s health centers that offer abortion services.
The Clarion-Ledger reports that over 100 supporters gathered at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, and listened to a personal account of Ruffalo’s about the issue of abortion rights, in which he mentioned his mother’s struggle to obtain an abortion when she was young:

I am a man. I could say this has nothing to do with me. Except I have two daughters and I have a mother who was forced to illegally have an abortion in her state where abortion was illegal when she was a very young woman. It cost $600 cash. It was a traumatizing thing for her. It was shameful and sleazy and demeaning. When I heard the story I was aghast by the lowliness of a society that would make a woman do that. I could not understand its lack of humanity; today is no different.

Ruffalo reportedly referenced the United States as it existed pre-Roe v. Wade as “relic of an America that was not free nor equal nor very kind”, saying that it “we have worked long and hard to leave behind” that time:

My own mother fought to make herself more than a possession; she lived her life as a mother who chose when she would have children, and a wife who could earn a living if she so chose. I want my daughters to enjoy that same choice. I don’t want to turn back the hands of time to when women shuttled across state lines in the thick of night to resolve an unwanted pregnancy, in a cheap hotel room just south of the state line. Where a transaction of $600 cash becomes the worth of a young woman’s life. So that is why I am lending my voice to you and your movement today. Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

Ruffalo has been politically active before; he’s a vocal opponent of fracking. And while his characterization of the impact of Roe v. Wade as a “law of the land for decades” is slightly historically inaccurate – anti-choice supporters have been chipping away at Roe v. Wade since that Supreme Court ruling came down – his decision to discuss abortion via women who have actually gone through it is a welcome relief from all the men talking about how they know thetruth about the experience.
(via Mark Ruffalo Sends an Awesome Pro-Choice Message in Mississippi)

Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

I love when people use their fame for good
kinderwhor3:

I think this is the best thing I’ve seen all day.LOVE.

"We’re all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it, that’s all."

The Breakfast Club (1985)

(Source: vintagegal, via vintagegal)

I hope the exit is joyful and I hope never to return.

- The last words of Frida Kahlo written in her diary (July 1954)

(Source: derniers-mots, via ouijacatt)

The song recounts a specific sexual assault (“One of the most shattering experiences of my life,” Grimes, who was born in Vancouver as Claire Boucher, told SPIN in 2012) by describing the psychic fallout: “And never walk about after dark/ It’s my point of view/ Because someone could break your neck/ Coming up behind you always coming and you’d never have a clue,” she lisps in her high, pinched voice. It’s a dazzling, paralyzing performance, in part because Boucher sounds almost playful, and in part because the skronking behind her—the song’s springy, propulsive synth line was one of 2012’s most unforgettable—indicates something other than victimization. “See you on a dark night,” Boucher repeats. […] But what “Oblivion” ultimately offers is victory. It’s the sound of one woman turning personal devastation into not just a career-making single, but a lasting anthem of transformation.

Grimes’ Oblivion is the best song of the decade - so far.

(Source: ozhin, via wiigz)


Robert De Niro photographed on the set of Taxi Driver (1976), dir. Martin Scorsese (purpose: continuity)
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